Events

Tuesday, February 20, 2018

Lecture: "Pope Francis’s Vision of International Politics and Diplomacy"

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Location: Room C103 Hesburgh Center for International Studies

Jodok Troy

Jodok Troy, a 2016–18 Visiting Scholar at the Europe Center, Stanford University, will explore and evaluate Pope Francis’ vision of international politics and diplomacy through examples from the papal human rights discourse and Holy See diplomacy.…

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Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Kamikiri: Papercutting Performance

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Location: Hesburgh Center for International Studies, Auditorium

Niraku2 Chinese Papercutting

A famous Japanese kamikiri performance artist, Hayashiya Niraku, will visit Notre Dame on Wednesday, February 21. This event is free and open to the public, and will be followed by a reception.

Kamikiri, which literally means “paper cutting,” is a traditional Japanese art that involves making delicate cut-out on a single sheet of paper. Niraku combines this art form with his performance skills to tell stories with the images he creates. He also takes requests from the audience, transforming their ideas into paper cut-outs right before their eyes, and giving them unique souvenirs of the experience. As an artist, he must maintain a breadth of knowledge about current topics, and use his imagination and paper-cutting skills to transform the paper into anything the audience desires. …

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Thursday, February 22, 2018

Work in Progress: "The Scope of Development Studies in Its Interaction with Religion: Multidisciplinary Crossings and Boundaries"

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Severine Deneulin

Séverine Deneulin (DPhil, University of Oxford)
2017-2018 Kellogg Visiting Fellow
Associate Professor of International Development at the University of Bath

Over the last fifteen years, the area of “religion and development” has significantly expanded, raising the question of whether theology is a new discipline that should be included in development studies. Some argue that those working in the field of international development should acquire greater religious literacy so as to dialogue with believers and challenge practices and interpretations of texts when these are an obstacle to development goals. The counter-argument is that development studies risks being an all-embracing field of the totality of human life, thus losing its specificity and over-treading its boundaries as a social field of analysis. The paper discusses the scope of development studies as a multi-disciplinary and emancipatory field of study when people’s religious beliefs and practices are taken into account in development research and practice.…

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Lecture: "The Art of Political Murder: Who Killed Bishop Gerardi?"

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Location: Room C103

Francisco Goldman

Author Francisco Goldman will discuss his 2007 nonfiction book, “The Art of Political Murder,” about the 1998 killing of Guatemalan Bishop Juan Gerardi just two days after he released an extensive, church-sponsored report that implicated the army in many of the 250,000 civilian deaths during the country’s 36-year civil war.…

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Tuesday, February 27, 2018

Lecture: "Slicing the Pie: Quantifying the Aggregate and Distributional Effects of Trade"

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Location: Room C103 Hesburgh Center for International Studies

Andres Rodriguez Clare

Andrés Rodríguez-Clare, the Edward G. and Nancy S. Jordan Professor of Economics at the University of California, Berkeley, will address new methods to quantify the net gains from trade for any country, distinguishing inequality-adjusted welfare changes from inequality-unadjusted welfare changes. The model is used to estimate these different effects for the United States for the case of China’s entrance to the world trade organization (the “China shock”) and for the (theoretical) case of a movement to complete autarky.…

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Thursday, March 1, 2018

Work in Progress: "Eroding Regimes: What, Where, and When?"

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Michael Coppedge

Michael Coppedge 
Professor of Political Science at Notre Dame
Faculty Fellow of the Kellogg Institute for International Studies

The political world lately seems to be filled with unexpected erosions of democracy. What is the most useful way to describe these phenomena? Do they all belong to a common syndrome? Certainly there are different degrees of erosion, but are there also different types? How common are such erosions in the world today? Is this a new phenomenon, or are there close parallels with events in the past? If we detect early warning signs of erosion, how concerned should we be that it will continue and culminate in the breakdown of democracy? This paper argues that there are two distinct erosion paths. First, there is a classic path of growing repression of speech, media, assembly, and civil liberties, combined with deteriorating political discourse. The second path involves the concentration of power in the executive at the expense of the courts and the legislature, similar to what Guillermo O’Donnell called “delegative democracy,” which entails the erosion of horizontal accountability. Venezuela emerges as the most extreme and most fully articulated instance of erosion along this second path.…

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